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The final curtain closes on CSD’s amazing “Little Shop of Horrors”

A+flower+shop+on+Skid+Row%3F+Before+Mr.+Mushkin%E2%80%99s+shop+became+famous+thanks+to+a+certain+plant%2C+the+one+telephone+on+the+counter+barely+rang+as+business+was+slow.
Callie Hobbs
A flower shop on Skid Row? Before Mr. Mushkin’s shop became famous thanks to a certain plant, the one telephone on the counter barely rang as business was slow.

When the final curtain closed on CSD’s two week long production of “The Little Shop of Horrors” musical, Audrey II had eaten her fair share of characters while audiences were amazed by an incredible performance. 

This production was performed in CSD’s high school Black Box Artspace theater in a proscenium-style set. All elements of the show from the singing/acting to the makeup/costumes to the physical stage set/prop use were evidently well practiced and put together.  

The setting for CSD’s production of “Little Shop of Horrors” had a flower shop stage, Skid Row alley, costumes, characters and amazing cinematic elements. (Callie Hobbs)

The show was a musical production with acting, singing and choreographed movements based on the “Little Shop of Horrors” movie.  

There were many sensitive subjects such as murder, self harm (both for the purpose of getting fresh blood to feed the plant called Audrey II) and domestic abuse. All of it was kept rather light with plenty of comedic relief.

This show was directed by CSD’s theater arts teacher Melissa Ohlman-Roberge and included a total of 33 students working in the cast, crew and band.  

The cast was made up of 21 total students, including three freshmen, five sophomores, three juniors, four seniors and six eighth graders.

Blake Tapia, who played Mr. Martin, loved the opportunity to work with such a great cast.

“The best part of being in the show is getting to grow as a teammate and meet new people,” said cast member Blake Tapia (‘25).  “It’s a super fun experience and you learn to help each other out. It’s also super fun to perform in front of live audiences.”

The show’s crew was composed of one adult and 11 total students, including two freshmen, four sophomores, four juniors and one eighth grader.

The feeling of camaraderie and teamwork also extended to the crew members.

“Definitely the community of people,” said crew member Kate Saussele (‘25) when asked her favorite part about being on the crew of this production. “Within a couple days or a week you’ve made friends that you end up having afterwards. You really quickly form connections with these people that you wouldn’t expect to otherwise.”

Other cinematic elements made this performance (the third time CSD has presented this musical) extremely memorable.

The makeup and costumes moved the storytelling along by showing character development as some characters learned about fashion and earned more money, and makeup relayed realistic visuals of one character, Audrey’s, physical abuse. 

There was also a great use of props in the storytelling.

The telephones in Mr. Mushnik’s store showed the growth of the shop as more customers began to call.

And then there was the constantly growing Audrey II plant. What started off as a small potted plant in Seymour‘s arms grew to a larger than life man (and women) eating monster whose phrase, “Feed Me,” left audiences wondering what (and who) Audrey II would eat next.

She started as a potted plant in Seymour‘s arms and, with a very special and peculiar diet, grew into a never before seen giant talking creature. (Callie Hobbs)

Overall, it was a very well done production that delivered the classic and beloved story of “Little Shop of Horrors” in all 10 performances.

After an amazing two week run, the final curtain fell for “Little Shop of Horrors,” marking the final performance for many seniors in the cast and crew. (Callie Hobbs)
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Callie Hobbs
Callie Hobbs, Sports Editor. Opinions Editor

Callie Hobbs is a junior at CSD who has been at the school since 4th grade. She joined the journalism team this year for the first time because she loves to write and is creatively inspired by the world around her.

Callie is the junior team captain of CSD’s varsity cross-country team and loves to run on trails and sidewalks/greenways. To Callie, running is an outlet to think things through. Outside of school, Callie enjoys simply relaxing, finding inspiration and dreaming up ideas for creative projects and spending time with family.

“The miracle isn't that I finished. The miracle is that I had the courage to start.”  -John Bingham

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